Tag Archives: Cincinnati Reds

Season Preview – NL Central


Time to look at the 6 team NL Central division. You can also take a look at my previews of the AL East, AL Central, AL West, and NL East.

Last Year’s Records
Cincinnati – 91-71
St. Louis – 86-76
Milwaukee – 77-85
Houston – 76-86
Chicago – 75-87
Pittsburgh – 57-105

Notable Additions

Chicago – Carlos Pena, Matt Garza, Kerry Wood

Cincinnati – Edgar Renteria

Houston – Clint Barmes

Milwaukee – Zack Greinke, Shaun Marcum, Yuniesky Betancourt, Takashi Saito, Mark Kotsay

Pittsburgh – Lyle Overbay, Garrett Atkins, Kevin Correia, Scott Olsen, Joe Beimel

St. Louis – Ryan Theriot, Lance Berkman

Notable Losses

Chicago – Sam Fuld, Tom Gorzelanny

Cincinnati – Arthur Rhodes, Orlando Cabrera, Aaron Harang

Houston – Matt Lindstrom, Felipe Paulino

Milwaukee – Brett Lawrie, Alcides Escobar, Lorenzo Cain, Gregg Zaun

Pittsburgh -  Zack Duke, Andy LaRoche, Lastings Milledge

St. Louis – Brendan Ryan, Pedro Feliz, Brad Penny, Jeff Suppan

My Thoughts

Chicago – The Cubs had a very disappointing season last year, and went out and tried to plug some of those holes this offseason. Bringing in Carlos Pena on a 1 year contract, despite its cost, looks like a very nice signing for a power bat. The acquisition of Matt Garza brings a young, cost-controlled high-end starting pitcher to their rotation, but at the cost of top prospects Hak-Ju Lee, Chris Archer, and others.  I am not sold that this team will compete this year, as they will need bounceback performances from Alfonso Soriano, Aramis Ramirez, and Carlos Zambrano to really end up in the thick of the race.

Cincinnati – The defending NL Central champions, the team has lost Aaron Harang and will hope that the combination of Mike Leake, Travis Wood, and others will be able to pitch complete seasons this year. The team returns nearly every player from last season’s title, but I don’t think that it is a slam-dunk that they will just run away with the division again this year.

Houston – Talk about a rebuilding effort. Here’s a team which has very few high-end prospects in the system right now, who also does not have a lot of higher-quality players at the Major League level either. There are some quality players in Hunter Pence and Brett Myers, but there’s not a lot of hope for the 2011 season. They will look to get a solid rookie season out of last year’s acquisition, Brett Wallace, but you have essentially gathered a group of mid-level players who can fill out a roster, but are unlikely to compete as a group for a division title, let alone a league championship

Milwaukee – And within the same division, you have a team who has gone all-in for 2011. The Brewers have traded nearly all of their top prospects in order to improve their pitching staff, and did so with the acquisitions of Marcum and Greinke. It’s not a great sign that Greinke is hurt already, but he should return in mid April and only miss a few starts. The bigger story throughout the season will be whether or not they fall out of contention and attempt to trade Prince Fielder before the deadline. They definitely remain a team to be reckoned with in the NL Central.

Pittsburgh – For a team that lost 105 games last year, they actually have a lot to look forward to. Center fielder Andrew McCutchen is poised to become one of the best young players in the Majors, and 2nd year players Jose Tabata and Pedro Alvarez both will look to build on their solid rookie years. They aren’t likely to compete this season, but there’s hope for Pirates fans that is starting to show itself at the Major League level.

St. Louis – The biggest story out of St. Louis up until the start of Spring Training was whether or not Albert Pujols would sign a contract extension prior to the start of the season, and unfortunately it’s no longer the current top story out of their camp. With Cy Young runner up Adam Wainwright out for the season with Tommy John surgery, they will now look to replace at least some part of his production in the starting rotation. I’m not sold that this team, as constructed, can compete for the division title. They will need everything else to fall just right for them to win this division.

Overall Thoughts

The NL Central really has the look of a wide open division. If things fall just right, 4 of the teams could conceivably win the division this season. That said, I’m not sold that things will fall right for all of them, but it should be intersting to watch regardless.  Here’s my predicted order of finish:

1. Milwaukee
2. Cincinnati
3. St. Louis
4. Chicago
5. Pittsburgh
6. Houston

Who are the Faces of the Franchise? NL Central Edition


Only two divisions left to look at for the Faces of the Franchise, but there’s some definite notable ones here .

  • Cubs – At the moment, the player who is most known for being a Cub has to be Carlos Zambrano. Whether or not that is a good thing or not remains to be seen, but the team seems like it is more associated with him than some of the more famous position players like Alfonso Soriano and Aramis Ramirez. Continue reading

Hall of Fame Ballot Review – Barry Larkin


Around this time last year, I went through and reviewed the case for a number of players for the Hall of Fame, and whether or not I thought that they deserved to be enshrined in the Hall. I’ll be doing this again this year, and for players I reviewed previously, I will revisit my vote and see if it has changed in a year’s time. Theoretically, this should remain the same, but there’s always a chance I am now a whole year wiser than I was last year. Today’s candidate is one that I looked at last year, Barry Larkin

Larkin was eligible for the Hall for the first time in the 2010 class (2009), and you can find what I wrote last year below. He finished the voting last year with 278 votes out of a possible 539 ballots (51.6%). He seems likely to pick up more votes for this year’s election, although I’m not sure if he will pick up enough to get past 75%. Continue reading

Loss of A Legend: Sparky Anderson


News came today that the baseball world lost one of its’ managerial legends with the passing of Sparky Anderson. Anderson was a bit before my time, retiring after the 1995 season, but I had definitely heard of him and knew that he had accomplished a lot as both the manager of the Reds and the Tigers.

According to his Baseball-Reference.com manager page, Anderson became the manager of the Cincinnati Reds for the 1970 season, and proceeded immediately to lead the team to a 102-60 record and the National League pennant. He was the manager for the famous Big Red Machine, leading the Reds to the 1975 and 1976 World Series championships, and only finished out of the top 2 in the NL West once season out of the 9 years he managed the team. He was unceremoniously fired after the 1978 season despite this performance, and ended up as the manager of the Tigers during the 1979 season. He would spend the next 17 season as the manager of the Tigers, winning 2 AL East titles and the 1984 World Series.

Some key accomplishments in his career, according to his Wikipedia page:

  • He was the first manager to win the World Series in both leagues (1975-1976 with the Reds, 1984 with the Tigers)
  • He was the AL Manager of the Year twice (1984, 1987)
  • He finished his career 3rd on the all-time managerial wins list when he retired, and is currently 6th on the list now.
  • He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2000 by the Veterans Committee.
  • His #10 was retired by the Reds, and his #11 has been inactive with the Tigers since his retirement.

Anderson seemed to be widely viewed as a class act, and one of the game’s greats. He will definitely be missed, and while a lot of that will be centered around Cincinnati and Detroit, the whole baseball world has lost a legend today.

Season Preview in Review – National League Central


Back during Spring Training, I took a look at each team and made predictions about how each team would do and how I thought their season would go. This was the first year doing this, and I figured now was a good time to take a look back and see how it went. I previously looked at each of the divisions in the American League and the NL East, and I move now to the NL Central.

Chicago Cubs

Predicted Record: 87-75
Actual Record: 75-87

I had thought that the Cubs would find a way to put it together this season, and find a way to win what definitely appeared to be a weak division. Unfortunately, it was not to be, and the team really spun out of control throughout the season. The bright spots for the team really seemed to be the emergence of rookie shortstop Starlin Castro and the performance that manager Mike Quade was able to coax out of the team. Hopefully they will be able to make a quick recovery in 2011. Continue reading

Trade Retrospective: Ken Griffey Jr


I always find it extremely interesting to see how trades worked out for the teams involved, and what effects the trade had on both teams’ fortunes. I’ll be doing one of these each week, as there have been so many blockbuster trades that happened in recent years.

One of the first blockbuster trades of the 2000s was the requested, and achieved trade of Ken Griffey Jr to the Reds for OF Mike Cameron, SP Brett Tomko, IF Antonio Perez, and P Jake Meyer.

The Background

Griffey requested a trade to Cincinnati so that he could be closer to his home and his family. Griffey had posted 3 consecutive seasons of 45+ home runs and 134+ RBI, and was going to be 30 years old in 2000. Griffey was going to be a free agent after the 2000 season, and the Mariners must have known that they were unlikely to keep Griffey.

The Mariners were coming off of a 79-83 season where they finished in 3rd place, and also knew that young SS Alex Rodriguez would also be a free agent after the 2000 season. The team would most likely have to begin a rebuilding effort based on the rest of the competition in the division, and moving Griffey would help to move that forward.

The Reds had finished 1999 with a 96-67 record, losing a play-in game against the Mets for the Wild Card playoff spot. I imagine that they had to feel that bringing the elite Ken Griffey Jr in would be enough to help put them over the top in their division.

The Moving Pieces

Griffey went to Cincinnati, and almost immediately signed a 9 year, $112.5 million contract extension. The Reds slotted him in to play CF, and were hopeful that he would help to bring them closer to a championship. With 398 career homeruns, it was widely expected that he would be able to compete for the all-time home run record in Cincinnati, and reach that number before the end of the contract.

Mike Cameron was slotted in by the Mariners to replace Griffey in center field. Cameron had been the starting center fielder in Cincinnati, and posted a .256 batting average with 21 HR, 66 RBI and 38 SB. While he wasn’t going to be Griffey in the outfield, he still had the potential to be a very solid center fielder and was also under team control for 4 more seasons.

Brett Tomko was 26 and coming off of a 5-7 season record with 132 strikeouts in 172 innings (33 appearances).

Jake Meyer was a 24 year old minor leaguer who had finished the season with the Reds’ AA team. He had posted a 3.57 ERA with 16 saves between A and AA.

Antonio Perez had been an international signing by the Reds, and was a 19 year old shortstop who had dominated the Midwest League with a .288 batting average, 7 home runs, and 35 stolen bases.

What Happened Next

Ken Griffey had another excellent season, although slightly below his previous levels. He hit .271/.387/.556 with 40 HR, 118 RBI, and 100 runs scored. Unfortunately, this didn’t lead to the improvement that they had hoped, and the Reds finished 85-77, 10 games back in the division and out of the playoffs.

The Mariners, almost surprisingly, went in the opposite direction, finishing 91-71 and winning the AL Wild Card. Mike Cameron hit 19 HR and stole 24 bases while playing a solid center field.

The Net Moves

Cincinnati – First Level

  • Cincinnati had Griffey for the 9 seasons of the contract, but it didn’t quite play out the way they had hoped. Griffey spent large portions of the 2001-2007 seasons on the disabled list, and the contract hamstrung the team. The performance surrounding Griffey was poor also, as they never won more than 80 games while Griffey was with the team.
  • At the end of his stint with the Reds, Griffey had hit 210 home runs, but had only averaged 105 games per season there.
  • In 2008, he was traded to the White Sox in the hope that he could compete for a championship. The Reds acquired P Nick Masset and IF Danny Richar for him.

Cincinnati – Second Level

  • Richar spent the remainder of the 2008 and 2009 seasons with the Reds, appearing in only 23 games total. He was not brought back for 2010.
  • Masset has spent both the remainder of 2008 and all of 2009 with the Reds. He has posted a 6-1 record with a 2.74 ERA in 95 innings over the two seasons, and remains in the bullpen for the Reds in 2010.

Seattle – First Level

  • Mike Cameron spent the 2000-2003 seasons with the Mariners, averaging 152 games a season, hitting 87 home runs, stealing 106 bases, and posting a .256 batting average. He left via free agency, and no compensation was received.
  • Brett Tomko spent the 2000 and 2001 seasons with the Mariners, posting a 10-6 record overall in 43 appearances (12 starts) and a 4.82 ERA. He was traded in the 2001 offseason, along with C Tom Lampkin and IF Ramon Vazquez to the Padres for C Ben Davis, IF Alex Arias, and P Wascar Serrano.
  • Antonio Perez never played in the Majors for the Mariners, and was traded to the Devil Rays in part of the compensation that the  Mariners received for signing manager Lou Piniella. The Mariners received OF Randy Winn as well.
  • Jake Meyer never made it to the Majors, not with the Mariners or with anyone else. He was traded to the White Sox in 2002 as a part of a trade involving another minor leaguer.

Seattle – Second Level

  • C Ben Davis was included in the trade of SP Freddy Garcia to the White Sox. This trade netted the Mariners C Miguel Olivo, IF Mike Morse, and OF Jeremy Reed. Reed, it was thought, would be able to play CF for the Mariners and help to bring some offense to the lineup as well.
  • P Wascar Serrano and IF Alex Arias had essentially no impact on the Mariners, as neither played in a game for the team. Arias was released, and Serrano did not pitch.
  • OF Randy Winn played for the Mariners for the 2003-2005 seasons, being traded to the Giants at the trading deadline for P Jesse Foppert and C Yorvit Torrealba. Foppert played in AAA for the Mariners, never pitching in the Majors before being released. Torrealba spent the remainder of the 2005 season with the Mariners before being traded to the Rockies for a minor leaguer.

Seattle – Third Level

  • Miguel Olivo was traded to San Diego for a pair of minor leaguers (Nathaniel Mateo and Miguel Ojeda), neither of whom pitched in the Majors.
  • Mike Morse was traded in 2009 to Washington for OF Ryan Langerhans, who played in 38 games for the Mariners, and is currently on the Major League roster.
  • Jeremy Reed never really fulfilled the potential he was thought to possess, playing sporadically from 2004-2008 and posting a .255 batting average with 11 HR and 19 SB over the 4 seasons. He was traded after the 2008 season as a part of the 3 team trade with the Mets and the Indians. The Mariners sent RP J.J. Putz and Sean Green to the Mets, and IF Luis Valbuena to the Indians, and received back from Cleveland OF Franklin Gutierrez, and from New York received IF Mike Carp, OF Endy Chavez, RP Aaron Heilman and Jason Vargas, and prospects Maikel Cleto and Ezequiel Carrera.
  • Gutierrez is a fixture in the Mariners outfield, and widely considered to be the top defensive center fielder in all of baseball right now.
  • P Aaron Heilman was traded to the Chicago Cubs for SS Ronny Cedeno and P Garrett Olson without throwing a pitch for the team.
  • During midseason 2009, the Mariners moved SS Ronny Cedeno as a part of the trade that brought SS Jack Wilson and SP Ian Snell to Seattle.

Overall Reactions

This is a trade that overall, I thought would be really good for the Reds at the time. Griffey had shown himself to be an elite outfielder, and well on his way to being the greatest player of all time. Injuries derailed that thought, and the Reds spent a lot of money and unfortunately did not get nearly the production and wins that they had hoped for.

For the Mariners, this trade has eventually worked itself out to some extent. Frankin Gutierrez, Ian Snell, and Jack Wilson are all major players on the current Mariners roster, and the team was able to make the playoffs in 2000 and 2001 with the contributions of the players acquired.

I think that overall, this is one of those trades that had the potential to be really a good one for both teams, and in the end they both got lackluster results overall.

Team Preview – Cincinnati Reds


Roster Makeup
Lineup Pitching Staff
Pos Name Role Name
C Ramon Hernandez SP 1 Aaron Harang
1B Joey Votto SP 2 Bronson Arroyo
2B Brandon Phillips SP 3 Johnny Cueto
3B Scott Rolen SP 4 Homer Bailey
SS Orlando Cabrera SP 5 Matt Maloney
LF Chris Dickerson Bullpen
CF Drew Stubbs CL Francisco Cordero
RF Jay Bruce RP Nick Masset
Bench RP Arthur Rhodes
IF Aaron Miles RP Jared Burton
OF Jonny Gomes RP Micah Owings

Additional roster information can be found at MLB Depth Charts.

Off-Season Transactions
Key Additions Key Losses
Pos Name How Pos Name How
SP Aroldis Chapman Free Agency CF Willy Taveras Trade (OAK)
SS Orlando Cabrera Free Agency IF Adam Rosales Trade (OAK)

Top Prospects: Aroldis Chapman (P), Yonder Alonso (1B), Todd Frazier (IF), Mike Leake (P)

2009 Review

The Reds finished up 2009 with a 78-84 record, and although the season didn’t end with a winning record, they still had some definite bright spots. 1B Joey Votto posted a .322 batting average with 25 HR and 84 RBI, despite missing almost 30 games due to depression. 2B Brandon Phillips quietly posted another 20-20 season. The rotation was led by Bronson Arroyo (15-13, 3.84 ERA), although there was a lot of inconsistency behind him. Closer Francisco Cordero (39 sv, 2.16 ERA) also had a solid season.

Team Outlook for 2010

The Reds look much improved (even though they didn’t really make too many moves), and I think have the potential to compete in the NL Central in 2010. Their rotation looks good, and I think it could keep them in the race longer if they can get a little bit lucky as well. For this to happen, they need Johnny Cueto and Homer Bailey to really start to live up to their potential. I liked the signing of Orlando Cabrera to bring some veteran presence to a team that is still very young. The biggest signing in the offseason has to be Cuban defector Aroldis Chapman. Chapman has looked lights out so far in Spring Training,  although it was thought at the time of the signing that he wouldn’t start the season higher than AA. But with his performance, he may force his way into the rotation at the start of the season. Joey Votto and Brandon Phillips should continue to lead the offense, and I think that OF Jay Bruce could really start to show more of the promise he had coming into the league.

Fantasy Outlook for 2010

I think Joey Votto is primed for a big season, and think he could easily post a top-10 season at 1B. 2B Brandon Phillips is one of the quietest top fantasy performers in all of baseball, usually in the top 5 of the position. Nearly all of the starting pitchers in the rotation are ownable for deeper leagues, but in standard leagues I would say that they are all right around replacement level. If I had to pick one for upside, it would be Bailey. Aroldis Chapman probably has the most upside of anyone on the team, and is definitely worth monitoring as Spring Training continues.

Prediction for 2010

The Reds are steadily improving, and will hopefully take another step forward this season. I don’t think that they are quite ready though to take on the Cubs and Cardinals. But it won’t be long.

80-82, 4th in the NL Central

Free Agency Review – Starting Pitchers


As expected, the free agent class of starting pitchers was pretty deep this offseason, although there were very few solid options.

All salary data from ESPN.com’s Free Agent Tracker
All 2011 free agent information from MLB Trade Rumors’ 2011 Free Agent List

LH Starting Pitchers
Name Old New Years Total $
Randy Wolf LAD MIL 3 $29.75 M
Andy Pettitte NYY NYY 1 $11.75 M
Erik Bedard SEA SEA 1 $1.5 M
Aroldis Chapman CIN 6 $30.25 M
Doug Davis ARI MIL 1 $5.25 M

Notable Remaining Free Agents: Jarrod Washburn (DET)


Of all the lefties, Randy Wolf probably did the best in terms of capitalizing on a good season. Milwaukee got a very good veteran starting pitcher for a reasonable price. Bedard signed an incentive-laden deal which could be worth up to $8.5 M total, and if he earns them all, the Mariners will be extremely happy with the results as well. The most unusual signing in my opinion was the Chapman signing. The Reds, not known for spending a lot of money necessarily, sign a pitcher who will be under contract for 6 seasons, and be paying him for as much as 10 perhaps, and will hopefully not be starting his career in the Major leagues.

RH Starting Pitchers
Name Old New Years Total $
Rich Harden CHC TEX 1 $7.5 M
John Lackey LAA BOS 5 $82.5 M
Brad Penny SF STL 1 $7.5 M
Joel Pineiro STL LAA 2 $16 M
Justin Duchscherer OAK OAK 1 $2 M
Ben Sheets OAK 1 $10 M
Jon Garland LAD SD 1 $5.3 M
Colby Lewis JPN TEX 2 $5 M
Jason Marquis COL WAS 2 $15 M
Vicente Padilla LAD LAD 1 $5.025 M
Carl Pavano MIN MIN 1 $7 M

Notable Remaining Free Agents: Braden Looper (MIL), Todd Wellemeyer (STL), John Smoltz (STL), Pedro Martinez (PHI)

Lackey was the big name on the market this offseason, and got the big contract that went along with it. I was a bit surprised at the time about this since I didn’t really think that the Red Sox were in the market for a starting pitcher. However, it looks now like he will be the replacement for Josh Beckett should he leave via free agency after 2010. The Angels did well to replace Lackey with Pineiro. Pineiro, while not the same quality pitcher as Lackey, will provide more stability to the rotation being led now by Jered Weaver and Scott Kazmir. Free agency was also littered with high-risk, high-reward types like Harden, Sheets, and Duchscherer. The most interesting signing for a right hander to me is the Rangers’ signing of Colby Lewis. Lewis is returning from 2 seasons in Japan where he was very dominant, and should be interesting to watch this season.

Tomorrow: Free agency review of relief pitchers

Free Agency Review – 2B/SS


Yesterday, I went over this offseason’s free agent catchers, first basemen, and third basemen. Today, the middle infielders.

All salary data from ESPN.com’s Free Agent Tracker
All 2011 free agent information from MLB Trade Rumors’ 2011 Free Agent List

Second Basemen
Name Old New Years Total $
Placido Polanco DET PHI 3 $18 M
Orlando Hudson LAD MIN 1 $5 M
Freddy Sanchez SF SF 2 $12 M

Notable Remaining Free Agents: Felipe Lopez (MIL)

The thing that really stood out to me about the 2B free agents was the fact that Hudson, for a second year in a row, had to wait until nearly Spring Training to find a job. Minnesota is a good fit for him, as he’ll probably slot in near the top of the order and provide some excellent defense up the middle. I also thought it was interesting that Polanco decided to go to Philadelphia, and change positions to move to 3B to do so. I also wonder how much longer Felipe Lopez will be available as a free agent. He seems like too good of a player to still be without a job of some sort, especially considering his ability to play multiple positions in the infield.

Shortstops
Name Old New Years Total $
Marco Scutaro TOR BOS 2 $12 M
Orlando Cabrera MIN CIN 1 $3 M

Shortstop was extremely shallow this offseason. Miguel Tejada was available to play shortstop, but it became clear that no one believed he can be a starting major league shortstop any longer. Beyond Scutaro and Cabrera, nearly all the remaining players who could play shortstop were backups, or simply defensive specialists. Scutaro’s $12 M contract was easily the largest, both in terms of years and dollars. Clearly, by signing Scutaro, the Red Sox decided that they don’t believe Jed Lowrie is a Major League shortstop, either. Cabrera surprises me again this season, as he had a season that was pretty consistent with his career averages, and yet somehow continues to have difficulty finding a job via free agency.

Tomorrow’s free agent positional review: The Outfielders

Prospect Review – Yonder Alonso – 1B – CIN


Baseball Reference.Com Profile
Fangraphs Profile

The Basics
Bats: Left
Throws: Right
How Acquired: Drafted in the 1st round (#7 overall) of the 2008 Amateur Draft by the Reds
Age: 23

Statistics

2009 – Sarasota (Florida State League – Reds High-A) – 49 games

  • .303/.383/.497
  • 7 HR, 38 RBI, 0 stolen bases
  • 24 walks, 30 strikeouts
  • .333 BABIP

2009 – Carolina (Southern League – Reds AA) – 29 games

  • .292/.372/.457
  • 2 HR, 14 RBI, 1 stolen base
  • 14 walks, 15 strikeouts

Rankings
Baseball America – #2 (CIN – 2010)
Baseball Prospectus – #4 (CIN – 2010) – 3 star
John Sickels – #3 (CIN – 2010) – B+

Analysis

Alonso was drafted out of the University of Miami in the 2008 draft, but only saw action in 6 games after signing with the Reds. 2009 was essentially his pro debut, and started his season at High-A Sarasota. He showed excellent plate discipline (24 walks to 30 strikeouts), along with some solid power (7 HR, 13 doubles) before being promoted to AA Carolina. Alonso was there for about 3 weeks before suffering a hamate bone injury which cost him almost 2 months of development time. August was a poor month for Alonso (.214/.358/.238), but he rebounded in September in split duty between AA Carolina and a brief call-up to AAA Louisville (.381/.447/.667).

I really like Alonso’s plate discipline (43 walks vs. 49 strikeouts overall), and think that the Reds could be trying to fast-track him towards the Majors. Alonso should develop power, and I could see him being a 20+ homer hitter in the Majors with a solid batting average.

The biggest concern I am seeing for Alonso right now is that he’s blocked at the Major League level, with 1B being played by Joey Votto. I get the impression that his fielding would limit him to either 1B or a corner outfield spot. He doesn’t really appear to have a lot of speed (1 SB, 0 triples), so I could see him potentially being a hindrance in the outfield as well. But thankfully, it’s  something the Reds do not have to decide on right now.

Outlook

Alonso looks like he’s going to develop into a pretty good hitter, both for average and for power. He’s probably 2 full seasons away from the Majors, especially if they cannot figure out a position to have him play effectively at the Major league level. However, they should be able to figure something out when his bat is ready.

Prediction for 2010

.295/.385/.490, 19 HR, 75 RBI (AA/AAA)

Expected ETA

Either late 2011 or early on in the 2012 season.

Tomorrow’s Prospect for Review (Last in the Series!): P Jacob Turner of the Detroit Tigers