Tag Archives: Jimmy Rollins

Who Are the Faces of the Franchise? NL East Edition


Time to start looking at the Senior Circuit, beginning with the 5 teams in the East…

  • Braves – This one has to be Chipper Jones as of right now. He’s easily the longest tenured Brave, has been with the team his entire career, and has been an excellent player throughout. I could see this role going to either Brian McCann or Jason Heyward when Chipper finally decides to hang them up.
  • Marlins – For better or worse, it’s definitely Hanley Ramirez for the Marlins. The largest contract in the history of the team was given to Hanley, and was well deserved based on his performance. The only thing I can remember even remotely being negative around him was when his previous manager called him out for a lack of hustle.
  • Mets – David Wright and Jose Reyes really stand out to me for the Mets. I’d be more inclined to give the nod to Wright since he has not been injured nearly as often as Reyes in recent years, and it could continue that way with Reyes potentially being a free agent after this season.
  • Phillies – This one’s actually a lot more difficult than I would have thought it would be. There are so many big name players on the Phillies now that picking one by themselves is very difficult. Chase Utley, Jimmy Rollins, and Roy Halladay could all vie for this role, but I think for now it has to be Ryan Howard. The former MVP seems to be out front for the organization more than any other player, including Halladay.
  • Nationals – Last year, I would have said it had to be Stephen Strasburg. But with his injury, and the gigantic contract given to Jayson Werth, Werth has to be the de facto face of the franchise. It remains to be seen whether or not he can live up to the expectations that come with a contract that size, but for now it’s definitely on him to try.

Fantasy Rankings in Review – Shortstop


Back in February, I took my first shot at attempting to rank players for fantasy purposes. After a full season, I thought it wise to take a look back at how they went, and compare them to how it actually turned out and see if there is anything to be gained from it. Next up is the review of my SS rankings.

My Preseason Rankings
1. Hanley Ramirez
2. Troy Tulowitzki
3. Jimmy Rollins
4. Ben Zobrist
5. Derek Jeter
6. Jose Reyes
7. Jason Bartlett
8. Elvis Andrus
9. Marco Scutaro
10. Alexei Ramirez
11. Ryan Theriot
12. Asdrubal Cabrera
13. Miguel Tejada
14. Alcides Escobar
15. Cliff Pennington

Yahoo’s Final Rankings (Top 15)
1. Troy Tulowitzki
2. Hanley Ramirez
3. Derek Jeter
4. Alexei Ramirez
5. Jose Reyes
6. Stephen Drew
7. Alex Gonzalez
8. Marco Scutaro
9. Rafael Furcal
10. Ben Zobrist
11. Omar Infante
12. Juan Uribe
13. Miguel Tejada
14. Elvis Andrus
15. Ian Desmond

I also mentioned J.J. Hardy, Stephen Drew, Yunel Escobar, and Everth Cabrera as potential deep league plays, and specifically to avoid Rafael Furcal.
From my preseason rankings, Cliff Pennington (19), Ryan Theriot (21), and Jason Bartlett (23) all finished in the top 25. Jimmy Rollins, Asdrubal Cabrera, and Alcides Escobar all finished outside of the top 25.
Free Agents: Edgar Renteria, Miguel Tejada, Juan Uribe

What We Saw

  • Despite missing part of the season, Troy Tulowitzki pretty clearly had the best season of anyone with SS eligibility. His September was definitely one to remember as well. I imagine we might see some rankings next year with him ahead of Hanley Ramirez, but I’m not sure I could go that far yet. But I definitely wouldn’t fault people who do that.
  • Derek Jeter had what was widely considered to be a down year for himself in 201, and still finished 3rd in Yahoo’s rankings. While the batting average was definitely down, he still had double digit steals and home runs, and scored 111 runs. Still a lot of value there.
  • So much for my thought that the fantasy value of Rafael Furcal was less than zero. Oops. He would have been higher up in the final rankings had he played more games, but I’m not sold he would have kept up that production if he had.
  • Jimmy Rollins is going to be a very nice value pick to some people next year, but I definitely don’t trust him to either stay healthy or to be productive when he is healthy. It is telling that he fell outside the top 25 at a position as shallow as SS.
  • Ian Desmond and Starlin Castro both strike me as players who will be in the top 15 for 2011, if not potentially top 10 players. They should improve with a full season under their belts.
  • Overall, the position is probably at one of its most shallow points. It seems to fall off pretty quick once you get past the top 5 or so, and you kind of end up with a lot of players who do 1 or 2 things, but not all 5.

Preliminary 2011 Rankings (Very Raw)
1. Hanley Ramirez
2. Troy Tulowitzki
3. Jose Reyes
4. Derek Jeter
5. Alexei Ramirez
6. Stephen Drew
7. Jimmy Rollins
8. Ian Desmond
9. Elvis Andrus
10. Starlin Castro

Original Draft Series: #11 – Philadelphia Phillies


For those that missed the guidelines I am using for this series of posts, you can find them here.

Team #12: Philadelphia Phillies

General Managers(since 1994)

Lee Thomas (1994-1997): 258-325
Ed Wade (1998-2005): 643-652
Pat Gillick (2006-2008): 266-220
Ruben Amaro Jr (2009-Current): 93-69

Team Performance

Playoffs Division Finish
WC League Playoff App 1st 2nd 3rd 4th Last
1 2 3 3 4 5 1 3

All information is drawn from Baseball Reference.

Position Name Acquired Years with Org.
Stats with Organization
Left?
C Carlos Ruiz Int’l FA – 1998 12 440 gm, .256/.347/.390, 27 HR, 165 RBI, 10 SB Currently with Org.
1B Ryan Howard 2001 – 5th Rd 9 2005 NL ROY, 2006 NL MVP, 3 All-Star Appearances, 1 Silver Slugger
836 gm, .281/.373/.578, 245 HR, 721 RBI
Currently with Org.
2B

2000 – 1st Rd (15) 10 5 All Star Appearances, 4 Silver Sluggers
963 gm, .294/.380/.518, 172 HR, 622 RBI, 88 SB
Currently with Org.
3B Scott Rolen 1993 – 2nd Rd 9 1997 NL ROY, 1 All Star Appearance, 3 Gold Gloves
844 gm, .282/.373/.504, 150 HR, 559 RBI, 71 SB
Traded to STL – 7/29/02
SS Jimmy Rollins 1996 – 2nd Rd 14 2007 NL MVP, 3 All Star Appearances, 3 Gold Gloves, 1 Silver Slugger
1456 gm, .273/.329/.437, 150 HR, 646 RBI, 335 SB
Currently with Org.
LF Pat Burrell 1998 – 1st Rd (1) 10 1306 gm, .257/.367/.485, 251 HR, 827 RBI Left via Free Agency – 11/6/08
CF Michael Bourn 2003 – 4th Rd 4 122 gm, .268/.340/.362, 1 HR, 6 RBI, 19 SB Traded to HOU – 11/7/07
RF Marlon Byrd
1999 – 10th Rd 6 256 gm, .271/.332/.377, 13 HR, 79 RBI, 13 SB Traded to WAS – 5/14/05
DH Domonic Brown 2006 – 20th Rd 4 7 gm, .259/.241/.296, 6 RBI, 1 SB Currently with Org.
SP Cole Hamels 2002 – 1st Rd (17) 8 1 All Star Appearance
55-41, 3.65 ERA, 824 K, 233 BB, 875.2 IP
Currently with Org.
SP Randy Wolf
1997 – 2nd Rd 9 1 All Star Appearance
69-60, 4.21 ERA, 971 K, 437 BB, 1175 IP
Left via Free Agency – 11/1/06
SP J.A. Happ 2004 – 3rd Rd 6 14-5, 3.11 ERA, 159 K, 84 BB, 217 IP Traded to HOU – 7/29/10
SP Brett Myers
1999 – 1st Rd (12) 10 73-63, 4.40 ERA, 21 SV, 986 K, 413 BB, 1183.2 IP Left via Free Agency – 11/6/09
SP Gavin Floyd 2001 – 1st Rd (4) 5 7-5, 6.96 ERA, 75 K, 64 BB, 108.2 IP Traded to CHW – 12/6/06
RP Robinson Tejeda Int’l FA – 1998 7 4-3, 3.57 ERA, 72 K, 51 BB, 85.2 IP Traded to TEX – 4/1/06
RP Alfredo Simon Int’l FA – 1999 5 No Major League Appearances with Org. Traded to SF – 7/30/04
RP Kyle Kendrick 2003 – 7th Rd 7 31-18, 4.58 ERA, 196 K, 125 BB, 430.2 IP Currently with Org.
RP Ryan Madson 1998 – 9th Rd 12 41-27, 3.86 ERA, 19 SV, 449 K, 167 BB, 539 IP Currently with Org.
RP Taylor Buchholz 2000 – 6th Rd 3 No Major League Appearances with Org. Traded to HOU – 11/3/03
CL Brad Ziegler 2003 – 20th Rd 1 No Major League Appearances with Org. Released – 3/28/04
BN Carlos Silva
Int’l FA – 1996 7 8-1, 3.83 ERA, 89 K, 59 BB, 171.1 IP Traded to MIN- 12/3/03
BN Jason Donald 2006 – 3rd Rd 3 No Major League Appearances with Org. Traded to CLE – 7/29/09
BN Lou Marson 2004 – 4th Rd 5 8 gm, .286/.375/.476, 1 HR, 2 RBI Traded to CLE – 7/29/09
BN Nick Punto 1998 – 21st Rd 5 77 gm, .223/.273/.272, 1 HR, 4 RBI, 2 SB Traded to Min – 12/3/03
BN Jason Michaels 1998 – 4th Rd 7 383 gm, .291/.380/.442, 21 HR, 100 RBI, 6 SB Traded to CLE – 1/27/06

June Amateur Draft

Well, they’ve done very well in the first few rounds of the draft. Clearly, adding players like Pat Burrell, Chase Utley, Cole Hamels, and Brett Myers in the first round is going to help. But the team has done well in the next 3 rounds as well, getting Ryan Howard, Jimmy Rollins, Scott Rolen, and Randy Wolf. This is one of the first teams that I can remember where I was able to put a solid major league regular into nearly every spot in the lineup and into the starting rotation, and it’s almost entirely from the draft. But they’ve also done well in later rounds, with Domonic Brown being the highest potential of anyone they’ve drafted after the 10th round so far. Even the players that they drafted that have not done a whole lot (Jason Donald, Lou Marson) were both used to acquire Cliff Lee in 2009.

International Free Agency

They have not been as active in international free agency as some teams, but with the success they’ve had in the draft, it’s not as glaring as a problem. The team has only had two success stories from the IFA markets in Carlos Silva and Carlos Ruiz. While it’s not a lot, there’s a lot of hope for Ruiz yet.

Overall Grade

B+. With 2 home grown MVPs, and quite a few players who would be welcome on any team in Chase Utley, Scott Rolen, and Cole Hamels, the team has done extremely well at not only scouting these players, but developing them and getting production for their own team out of them as well. The only weakness is the bullpen, but I’ve kind of come to the conclusion that the bullpen is something that any team can fill in with a little diligence. The fact that they have solid regulars at every lineup position, and 5 excellent starting pitchers leads me to give them this good grade.

Week in Review – June 21 to June 27


If the Playoffs Started Today

Boston Red Sox (46-31) vs. Texas Rangers (45-29)
Minnesota Twins (41-34) vs. New York Yankees (46-28)

New York Mets (43-32) vs. San Diego Padres (45-30)
Cincinnati Reds (42-34) vs. Atlanta Braves (44-32)

League Leaders

Batting Average – Robinson Cano (NYY) – .359
Runs – Kevin Youkilis (BOS) – 61
Home Runs – Miguel Cabrera (DET), Paul Konerko (CHW), Jose Bautista (TOR) – 20
Runs Batted In – Miguel Cabrera (DET) – 64
Stolen Bases – Juan Pierre (CHW) – 29

Wins – Ubaldo Jimenez (COL) – 13
Saves – Matt Capps (WAS) – 22
ERA – Ubaldo Jimenez (COL) – 1.60
Strikeouts – Jered Weaver (LAA) – 118
WHIP – Cliff Lee (SEA) – 0.91

Roster Movement

To the Disabled List: Dustin Pedroia, Mike Lowell, Felipe Paulino

Return from the Disabled List: Aramis Ramirez, Daisuke Matsuzaka, Jimmy Rollins, Nelson Cruz,

To the Minors: Sam LeCure, Dioner Navarro, Rick Porcello,

Called Up: Matt LaPorta, Madison Bumgarner, Brad Bergesen, Matt Joyce, Andrew Oliver,

Top Stories and Weekly Links

  • Erik Bedard made two different rehab starts this week, and is tentatively slotted in to make his return to the Majors on July 6th.
  • Tommy Hanson had a pair of forgettable starts this week, as he allowed a total of 14 earned runs over 6 2/3 innings pitched.
  • Ubaldo Jimenez had what was probably his worst start of the season, allowing 6 earned runs in 5 2/3 innings against the Red Sox on Wednesday. The regression was due at some point, and this could be it.
  • Injuries abound over the week, especially if your jersey says Red Sox on the front. The day after hitting 3 homers in a game, Dustin Pedroia fouled a pitch off the inside of his foot, breaking it. Return timetable: Uncertain, but placed on the disabled list. On Saturday, starting pitcher Clay Buchholz hyperextended his knee running the bases in the second inning. Return timetable: Unknown. And on Sunday, catcher Victor Martinez took a foul ball off of his left thumb during the game, breaking the thumb. Return timetable: Too soon to know yet. What a terrible weekend it was for the Red Sox in San Francisco, despite winning.
  • Edwin Jackson of the Diamondbacks threw the 4th no hitter of the season on Friday, throwing a season-high 149 pitches and walking 8 to do it. It’s been really interesting to see so many no-hitters, and reminds me a lot of the 1991 season, when there were 7 of them during the season.
  • Manager A.J. Hinch of the Diamondbacks was given a lot of grief for allowing his pitcher to throw that many pitches in pursuit of a no-hitter, but I’m inclined to believe that the group of the manager, the pitcher, and the pitching coach are going to know what their player can and cannot handle.
  • In a rather surprising move, the Marlins fired manager Fredi Gonzalez on Wednesday morning. The Marlins were in 4th place at the time, and ownership had made it pretty clear that they expected the team to be in the playoff hunt and make the playoffs at the end of the season. Whether or not that was really realistic remains to be seen, but the Marlins will continue to search for his replacement.
  • I don’t think we can really discuss the week that was without discussing Big Z and his big blowup during his start on Friday afternoon. Whether or not he was trying to fire up the team remains to be seen, but the Cubs did not appreciate the behavior, pulled him from the start after 1 inning, and suspended him indefinitely. It’s really been a lost season both for the Cubs and Zambrano himself, and Big Z will be sent to the bullpen when his suspension is over.
  • Saturday brought the season debut of Giants’ pitching prospect Madison Bumgarner. He pitched effectively in the loss, going 7 innings and not having 100 pitches in that time. If they keep him up the rest of the season, they will have added an excellent arm to an already top-tier pitching rotation.
  • Andy Oliver was called up on Friday to take the rotation spot of the recently demoted Rick Porcello, making his major league debut. His debut was nothing particularly amazing, but Oliver is probably best known for his legal fight regarding his eligibility to pitch in college.
  • Josh Hamilton has been hitting out of his mind for over 3 weeks now, as he is in the middle of a 21-game hitting streak. He has hit nearly .500 with a whole lot of power since the streak started.
  • Jose Guillen is also in the midst of a 21 game hitting streak, but it appears that it has not been nearly as prolific as the one by Hamilton at this point.
  • Stephen Strasburg continues to dominate major league hitters, and took his first loss of the season in a 1-0 game against the Royals this week. He now holds the record for most strikeouts in his first 4 starts of the career with 41 in that time.

Upcoming Posts This Week:

Tuesday: The Original Draft Series – Team #18 and #17
Wednesday: The Original Draft Series – Team #16 and #15
Thursday: The Month of June in Review
Friday:  Trade Retrospective – Rafael Palmeiro to the Rangers

The Month in Review – May 2010


Now fully 1/3 of the way into the season at this point, we’re starting to see some separation between the elite teams in the Majors and the rest of the league. Although there are very few teams who have been blown out of their races to this point, there are a couple still, and many more who are not far from having that problem either.

All-Star Teams

I plan on following the same guidelines given to the managers of the All-Star game when selecting my teams for each month. Those would be:

  • 34 man rosters, 21 position players, 13 pitchers
  • Each team must be represented

Now that we’ve started receiving the voting updates for the All-Star, I will start the lineups with that, and build the team around that. All stats are through Sunday’s games.

American League


American League Starters
Pos Name Team AVG OBP SLG R HR RBI SB
C Joe Mauer MIN .329 .404 .465 25 2 24 1
1B Mark Teixeira NYY .221 .336 .390 31 8 34 0
2B Robinson Cano NYY .362 .405 .607 36 10 37 2
3B Evan Longoria TAM .325 .391 .577 35 10 42 10
SS Derek Jeter NYY .297 .340 .425 32 5 31 5
OF Ichiro Suzuki SEA .342 .393 .421 23 1 10 13
OF Carl Crawford TAM .321 .376 .500 38 4 24 16
OF Nelson Cruz TEX .327 .405 .729 19 10 34 7
DH Vladimir Guerrero TEX .332 .361 .560 29 12 44 4
American League Reserves
Pos
Name Team AVG OBP SLG R HR RBI SB
1B Justin Morneau MIN .368 .488 .667 34 11 36 0
1B Miguel Cabrera DET .352 .427 .670 33 14 48 2
OF Alex Rios CHW .312 .368 .590 32 11 27 16
OF Shin-Soo Choo CLE .280 .385 .446 26 7 25 9
IF Kevin Youkilis BOS .298 .445 .573 45 10 29 1
DH David Ortiz BOS .272 .348 .581 21 11 31 0
IF Ty Wigginton BAL .288 .369 .565 23 13 32 0
C John Jaso TAM .310 .425 .448 12 2 19 0
SS Elvis Andrus TEX .311 .398 .350 35 0 13 18
3B Jose Bautista TOR .250 .369 .600 37 16 41 3
OF Vernon Wells TOR .301 .353 .602 34 13 36 2
DH Jose Guillen KC .250 .324 .479 31 11 33 1
1B Paul Konerko CHW .262 .366 .567 28 14 33 0
American League Pitching Staff
Role Name
Team W L SV IP ERA WHIP K
SP Jon Lester BOS 6 2 0 72.7 2.97 1.13 77
SP Doug Fister SEA 3 2 0 62 2.03 0.95 26
SP Andy Pettitte NYY 6 1 0 58.3 2.62 1.22 36
SP Jeff Niemann TAM 5 0 0 64.7 2.37 1.05 41
SP Jered Weaver LAA 4 2 0 68.7 3.01 1.15 74
SP David Price TAM 7 2 0 66.7 2.57 1.14 50
SP Matt Garza TAM 5 3 0 69.7 2.97 1.15 57
SP Shaun Marcum TOR 5 1 0 73 2.59 1.03 60
RP Mariano Rivera NYY 0 1 10 16.3 1.65 0.73 13
RP Rafael Soriano TAM 2 0 14 20.3 1.33 0.84 16
RP Jose Valverde DET 1 1 12 20.7 0.44 0.92 16
RP Jon Rauch MIN 1 1 12 20 2.70 1.25 14
RP Andrew Bailey OAK 0 1 10 19.7 1.37 1.02 11

And from the Senior Circuit…

National League Starters
Pos Name Team AVG OBP SLG R HR RBI SB
C Yadier Molina STL .258 .335 .346 8 2 28 6
1B Albert Pujols STL .310 .422 .572 31 12 38 3
2B Chase Utley PHI .277 .397 .520 35 10 24 2
3B Placido Polanco PHI .306 .342 .448 26 5 21 2
SS Jimmy Rollins PHI .341 .462 .634 11 2 7 2
OF Ryan Braun MIL .318 .385 .528 38 8 32 11
OF Shane Victorino PHI .262 .317 .461 29 8 33 10
OF Jayson Werth PHI .295 .369 .578 31 9 33 2
DH Andre Ethier LAD .392 .457 .744 25 11 38 0
National League Reserves
Pos Name
Team AVG OBP SLG R HR RBI SB
C Rod Barajas NYM .270 .293 .539 21 10 28 0
2B Kelly Johnson ARI .270 .373 .563 34 12 25 5
3B Scott Rolen CIN .275 .344 .550 28 11 32 0
OF Jason Heyward ATL .301 .421 .596 29 10 38 3
1B Joey Votto CIN .312 .408 .553 29 10 33 6
3B Casey McGehee MIL .302 .365 .513 25 9 41 1
SS Hanley Ramirez FLA .298 .379 .484 27 8 26 6
1B Jorge Cantu FLA .281 .332 .479 25 8 36 0
3B Ryan Zimmerman WAS .299 .374 .571 26 10 27 1
OF Jason Bay NYM .293 .381 .447 33 3 23 7
OF Andrew McCutchen PIT .313 .380 .469 29 6 14 12
IF Ryan Theriot CHC .286 .315 .316 24 0 14 9
National League Pitching Staff
Role Name Team W L SV IP ERA WHIP K
SP Ubaldo Jimenez COL 9 1 0 71.3 0.88 0.93 61
SP Roy Halladay PHI 7 3 0 86 1.99 0.99 70
SP Tim Lincecum SF 5 1 0 66 3.00 1.12 80
SP Jaime Garcia STL 4 2 0 55.3 1.14 1.14 45
SP Roy Oswalt HOU 3 6 0 69 2.35 1.01 69
SP Josh Johnson FLA 5 2 0 70 2.19 1.04 69
SP Carlos Silva CHC 7 0 0 60.7 3.12 1.10 42
SP Jon Garland SD 6 2 0 67 2.15 1.28 42
RP Heath Bell SD 2 0 14 23 1.17 1.30 30
RP Matt Capps WAS 0 1 17 24.3 2.96 1.32 23
RP Tyler Clippard WAS 7 3 0 34.7 1.82 1.14 40
RP Carlos Marmol CHC 1 0 11 24.7 1.46 1.14 49
RP Francisco Cordero CIN 1 3 15 25 3.60 1.48 20

It’s interesting to see how things change. For the most part, each team had a player that had distinguished himself from his teammates, and the rosters are not surprisingly similar to the ones I wrote up in April.

My Award Winners to Date

AL MVP –  Miguel Cabrera (DET)
NL MVP – Albert Pujols (STL)
AL Cy Young – David Price (TAM)
NL Cy Young – Ubaldo Jimenez (COL)
AL Rookie of the Year – Austin Jackson (DET)
NL Rookie of the Year – Jason Heyward (ATL)

Weekly Links and Weeks in Review

May 3-May 9
May 10-May 18
May 19-May 23

May 24-May 30

The month of May was dominated by two perfect games (the first time two have been thrown in the same season since 1880), some more prospect call ups (Starlin Castro), and further injuries (Grady Sizemore, Jimmy Rollins, Nelson Cruz). The Rays continue their dominance of the American League, as they will finish the month with the top record in the sport. The Reds have been the huge surprise, behind Joey Votto, a resurgent Scott Rolen, and rookie Mike Leake, they have the best record in the National League. The races are just going to continue to get more interesting as the months roll on here.

Early All Star Voting Thoughts


Well, the first set of All Star votes have been released, and I figured now was a good time to go over them and some of my thoughts on the whole process.

You can find the AL voting here, and the NL voting here, but here’s who they have listed as the starters as of Monday:

American League National League
C Joe Mauer C Yadier Molina
1B Mark Teixeira 1B Albert Pujols
2B Robinson Cano 2B Chase Utley
3B Evan Longoria 3B Placido Polanco
SS Derek Jeter SS Jimmy Rollins
OF Ichiro Suzuki OF Ryan Braun
OF Carl Crawford OF Shane Victorino
OF Nelson Cruz OF Jayson Werth
DH Vladimir Guerrero

Well, as seems to be the standard, there are a lot of Yankees. What is interesting to see is how many Phillies there are as well. I’m not sure if they have been doing any specific campaigns in Philadelphia to push their guys for the All-Star game, but something seems to be causing all those votes. Realistically, the only players who stand out to me right now as not really playing well enough to earn this honor are Teixeira and Rollins. Teixeira is still hitting only .207/.324/.374, and appears to be off to his worst start ever.

The issue I have with the All-Star game is that you have two concerns here: The voting, which is a popularity contest essentially, and the fact that the game decides who gets home-field advantage in the World Series. First, the voting. It seems like recently that there have been players getting voted to start in the All-Star game that done very little in this season to earn this honor. As a result, there ends up being some player that is left off of the roster because a player was voted in that probably doesn’t belong. Generally it seems like these players end up getting taken care of due to either injuries or players opting out for any number of reasons. However, it seems to me that most years there is some player who is a gross oversight for the roster.

The second problem started when the 2002 All-Star Game ended in a tie. Ever since, it seems like MLB has been trying to find a way to make the game more compelling. As a result of this thinking, they now give home field advantage in the World Series to whichever league wins the game. To me, they are trying to make this game important to the rest of the season, which it really should not be. The game is not managed the same way, the players don’t play it the same way as a regular season game, and at this point it seems really unfair to ask a manager to manage it like it were a regular season game.

To me, the All Star game really should be about showcasing the top players of the game. It really should have a similar role to the way the NBA All-Star Game is, where the game is kind of this free-for-all where the players are having fun, and that while who wins the game is important, it’s not all that important. One of the things I enjoy the most is seeing all the pomp and circumstance related to the start of the game, watching the players get introduced to either the adoration or scorn of the local fans.  It is an exhibition, and really should continue to be one. Hopefully at some point MLB will figure out that the team that plays the best during the regular season should get home field advantage throughout the playoffs. But I will watch the game and enjoy it until they do all the same.

The Week In Review: May 19th – May 23rd


If the Playoffs Started Now

Texas Rangers (25-20) vs. Tampa Bay Rays (32-12)
New York Yankees (26-17) vs. Minnesota (26-18)

Cincinnati Reds (25-19) vs. Philadelphia Phillies (26-17)
St. Louis Cardinals (26-19) vs. San Diego Padres (26-18)

Top Stories of the Week that Was

  • The Hanley Ramirez lack of hustle story appears to have resolved itself, after Ramirez met with his teammates and Hall of Famers Andre Dawson and Tony Perez. I really hope that this is the last time we hear about Hanley Ramirez in a bad light, because the Marlins really want (and need) him to be the face of their franchise when they move into their new stadium in 2012.
  • Trevor Hoffman worked the 8th inning of Sunday’s game for the Brewers, and appears to have been removed from the closer’s role at least in the short term. I really hope that by the end of the season he gets it back together and gets on a roll, as I have to imagine that this is most likely going to be his last season in the Majors. He’s only 4 short of 6o0 career saves, which I have to imagine he would love to achieve before retiring.
  • Milton Bradley returned from the restricted list, and sounds like he may be finally getting the help that he needs. The talent is definitely still there, but the key is that he may finally be in a good spot to get the support he needs. Seattle is full of clubhouse leaders like Ken Griffey Jr and Mike Sweeney, and I have to imagine they are helping a lot.
  • Eric Chavez was put on the disabled list on Saturday to help clear a spot for the returning Mark Ellis. Chavez has been experiencing neck spasms for the majority of the season, and it sounds like this may finally be the injury. Chavez said at the beginning of the season that if he suffered another major injury, he would most likely retire. Well, apparently that may be the case this time. As an A’s fan, the whole thing is really sad to me, as Chavez was so good for the start of his career, but was just completely derailed by injuries for the last 4 seasons.
  • Sunday brought sad news that Jose Lima had died of a heart attack. Lima wasn’t the best pitcher, but he was always one of the most entertaining to be sure. He had a really great season in 1999, when it was always Lima-Time. Sad to hear this.
  • Jimmy Rollins was placed on the disabled list again after reinjuring his leg. I’m wondering at this point if this is going to be a lost season along the lines of what happened to Jose Reyes last year.
  • Nyjer Morgan didn’t have the greatest week ever. On Wednesday, he misplayed a ball which ended up as an inside-the-park homerun. Which would have been bad enough, except that it also happened to him again on Saturday.  Hopefully this week will be better.
  • Brad Penny was having a pretty good game on Friday, when he came up with the bases loaded against Joel Pineiro. He hit a grand slam, and proceeded to not be able to come back out to the mound in the following inning. A back injury has landed him on the disabled list.
  • The injury bug hit some more big name players, as Jorge Posada and Grady Sizemore were both placed on the disabled list. For fantasy purposes, I would think that both of them are droppable in shallower leagues.

I’m working on a new project and am hoping to have posts for it up starting this week sometime.

The Week in Review: May 10th – May 18th


A little bit longer of a week for review this time around, as I’m a bit behind what with some travel and such.

If the Playoffs Started Today

Texas (22-18) vs. Tampa Bay (28-11)
New York A (25-14) vs. Minnesota (24-15)

San Francisco (22-16) vs. Philadelphia (24-14)
Cincinnati (23-16) vs. San Diego (23-16)

Current Statistical Leaders:

Batting Average: Andre Ethier – .392
On Base Percentage: Justin Morneau – .482
Slugging Percentage: Andre Ethier – .744
Homeruns: Paul Konerko – 13
RBI: Andre Ethier – 38
Stolen Bases: Juan Pierre – 18
Runs: Matt Kemp – 34

Wins: Ubaldo Jimenez and Tyler Clippard – 7
ERA: Ubaldo Jimenez – 1.12
Strikeouts: Tim Lincecum – 69
WHIP: Doug Fister and Tim Lincecum – 0.94
Saves: Matt Capps – 14

Roster Movement and Job Changes

Disabled List Movement:

Call Ups and Demotions:

Job Changes:

Top Stories and Weekly Links


The Week in Review – April 12-April 18


It’s been a pretty busy week, what with a 20 inning game, a no-hitter, and some really excellent performances.

If the Playoffs Started Today (Which Clearly, They Don’t)

Tampa Bay (WC) vs. Minnesota (C)
Oakland (W) vs. New York (E)

St. Louis (C) vs. Philadelphia (E)
Florida (WC) vs. San Francisco (W)

Last Week’s Top Performers

Shin-Soo Choo (CLE) – .579/.680/1.211, 3 HR, 11 RBI, SB, 5 R
Jose Guillen (KC) – .462/.500/.885, 3 HR, 5 RBI, SB, 7 R
Brett Gardner (NYY) – .385/.529/.385, 5 R, RBI, 4 SB
Denard Span (MIN) – .381/.552/.524, 8 R, 3 RBI, 3 SB
Ty Wigginton (BAL) – .348/.385/.913, 6 R, 4 HR, 10 RBI
Derek Jeter (NYY) – .500/.500/.955, 5 R, 3 HR, 7 RBI
Ivan Rodriguez (WAS) – .476/.500/.714, 7 R, 7 RBI, SB
Dan Uggla (FLA) – .464/.484/.821, 7 R, 2 HR, 7 RBI
Chase Utley (PHI) – .333/.481/1.048, 8 R, 5 HR, 8 RBI
Matt Kemp (LAD) – .333/.414/.875, 8 R, 4 HR, 8 RBI, SB
Andre Ethier (LAD) – ..423/.464/.769, 4 R, 3 HR, 9 RBI

Adam Wainwright (STL) – 17 IP, 1.06 ERA, 0.76 WHIP, 2 W, 16 K
Matt Garza (TAM) – 16 IP, 0.56 ERA, 0.94 WHIP, 2 W, 10 K
Ricky Romero (TOR) – 16 IP, 1.69 ERA, 0.63 WHIP, W, 18 K
Clayton Kershaw (LAD) – 12 1/3 IP, 2.19 ERA, 1.30 WHIP, W, 16 K
Ubaldo Jimenez (COL) – 9 IP, 0.00 ERA, 0.67 WHIP, W, 7 K (no-hitter)
Felipe Lopez (STL) – 1 IP, 0.00 ERA, 2.00 WHIP

Roster Movement and Job Changes

The biggest changes involved all the disabled list movement:

  • Chris Getz of the Royals was placed on the disabled list, and Alex Gordon was activated to take his spot on the roster.
  • Jimmy Rollins of the Phillies was placed on the disabled list, with Juan Castro replacing him in the lineup. Rollins should be out a few weeks.
  • Esmailin Caridad of the Cubs was placed on the disabled list
  • Aaron Rowand of the Giants was placed on the disabled list.
  • Brian Roberts and Felix Pie of the Orioles were both placed on the disabled list. It sounds like Roberts may be out for an extended period of time.
  • Kelly Shoppach of the Rays.
  • Aaron Hill of the Blue Jays
  • Brian Fuentes of the Angels was placed on the disabled list, and Fernando Rodney immediately filled the closer’s role for him.

Also of some note last week was that 2nd year pitcher Brett Anderson signed a contract extension that could take him through the next 6 seasons. Risk on both sides, but I think that the A’s have probably locked up an ace for these next 6 seasons at minimal cost.

Top Rookie Performers

Jason Heyward continues to be the story, as he is now hitting .302/.423/.581 with 3 HR and 15 RBI in just the first two weeks of the season. He finished up last week with a 3-rbi day yesterday, including a walk-off 2 run single. At this rate, I would be shocked if anyone was able to keep up with him for the Rookie of the Year. Jamie Garcia of the Cardinals had a good outing as well, throwing 7 shutout innings during Saturday’s 20 inning matchup.

In the American League, Austin Jackson of the Tigers has gotten off to a hot start, hitting .340/.389/.500 with 9 runs and 5 rbi. Of some concern is the fact that he has struck out 15 times to only 4 walks so far, but he is producing well at the top of the lineup to this point.

Top Stories and This Week’s Links

  • The biggest story of the week was the first no-hitter of the season, thrown by Ubaldo Jimenez of the Rockies on Saturday. He did this in spite of walking 6 batters throughout the game. And apparently on Sunday he went for a 6 mile jog to help clear his mind for his next start.
  • The Cardinals and Mets put on a clinic in poor lineup and bench management on Saturday. Their game went 20 innings, during which time the Mets ran out of players, warmed up their closer nearly every inning from the 8th onward, and had the starter from 2 days’ prior come on to get the save. However, the Cardinals won the award for the worst performance, as they ran out of pitchers after the 17th inning. So come the top of the 18th inning, 3B Felipe Lopez was called on to pitch, and managed to get through the inning without allowing a run. So in the 19th, they moved Lopez back to 3B and put the new 3B Joe Mather in for the next 2 innings, where he gave up 2 runs and ended up taking the loss.
  • Craig Calcaterra of NBC Sports has a really good article about what a simulated game is. It’s a really interesting read for anyone who has heard the term but wasn’t sure what it meant exactly.
  • Vin Scully marked his 60th year with the Dodgers. He is retiring at the end of this season, and even though I’m not a Dodger fan, it is truly remarkable that Scully has continued to work with the Dodgers for all these years.

    Statistical Analysis: What is BABIP?


    A term we hear a lot about when it comes to statistical analysis is BABIP. But what is BABIP, and how can it be used to help determine things about a player?

    I had planned on writing about what I know about BABIP, but after reading this article, it is apparent I know less than I thought I did. So instead, I’m just going to suggest that if you are interested in this, you read this article by Tristan Cockcroft from ESPN’s Fantasy Draft Kit. It’s an excellent primer on the topic, and I’m not sure I honestly could say it any better or really add that much to it.

    My biggest thing with BABIP is that it, like nearly all other statistics, don’t tell the whole story, but can help to give you an idea of something to look at when making distinctions about players. Let’s look at the top 5 and bottom 5 players in BABIP, and see what (if anything specific) we can discern about them.

    Leaders from Fangraphs.com for 2009 season:

    David Wright (.394 BABIP) – Wright hit .307 last season, which is well within his range of performance in the past. His BABIP was a bit higher than it had been in the past, previously ranging from .321 to .356 in the previous 4 seasons. With him, I am not entirely sure I am concerned about this, as he also saw a substantial drop in his home run total, and as a result would have had more balls in play. 10 additional homeruns (to bring his total for the season to 20) would have dropped his BABIP to .376, which while still higher than any previous season, would have been closer to the range he had hit in previously.

    Ichiro Suzuki (.384 BABIP) – Ichiro hit .352 in 2009, which was one of his highest averages in his career. For him though, his range of BABIPs since arriving in 2001 leads me to believe that while he may have been slightly lucky, it was not that far out of his range of expected numbers. His BABIP range since 2001: .316 to .399

    Hanley Ramirez (.379 BABIP) – Hanley hit for his best batting average to date, posting a .342 batting average in 2009. He had hit over .300 in each of the previous 2 seasons, and posted BABIPs from .329 to .353. There may be a little luck in there, but I think it would require more investigation into Hanley specifically to see if there is something else in there that helped him in 2009.

    Joe Mauer (.373 BABIP) – Mauer had his best season to date, posting a .365 batting average. Mauer has never posted a batting average for a full season under .293, and as a result his BABIP has also never dropped below .319 during that time. While .373 was his highest BABIP so far, he has consistently posted BABIPs over .320, and seems unlikely to see a particularly large regression in 2010.

    Joey Votto (.372 BABIP) – Votto completed only his 2nd full season in 2009, and improved his batting average by 25 points from his 2008 season (.297 to .322). However, his BABIP spiked from .328 to .372. While I don’t necessarily think he’s going to drop off the face of the earth for batting average, I could see him potentially regressing back closer to .300 than to .320. Another player who may have other factors playing into his statistics that aren’t as easily seen.

    Bottom 5 (Regulars only):

    Ian Kinsler (.241 BABIP) – Kinsler hit .253 for the season overall, and had posted BABIPs of .304, .279, and .334 in his previous 3 seasons. For me, I would think that he was probably at least a bit unlucky last season, as he was 30 points below his career low of .279. When he returns to the field of play, I could see a rebound back toward the .270 range for his batting average as his BABIP gets closer to the .300 range he had been averaging.

    Carlos Pena (.250 BABIP) – Pena hit .227, which was low even for him. In his previous two full seasons, his BABIP had been .297 and .298 respectively. The part that isn’t seen as easily is the fact that in those two seasons, his batting average was .282 and .247. So while he also appears to have been a bit unlucky, it is hard to discern which of the two batting averages is more likely to be the one you’ll get from him.

    Jimmy Rollins (.251 BABIP) – Rollins hit .250 last season, which was down from his career average of .275. Over the 6 seasons prior to 2009, his BABIP had never been below .281, and his batting average below .261. This is a player who has shown for the most part a specific range of what can be expected out of him, and should rebound this season as well.

    Yuniesky Betancourt (.256 BABIP) – Betancourt hit ,245 last season, but had previously shown himself to be able to hit .280-.290. During those same seasons, his BABIP had been between .289 and .308. Another player who may have been a bit unlucky last season at the plate.

    Aubrey Huff (.260 BABIP) – Huff hit .241 last season, well off of his career average of .282. His BABIP range doesn’t necessarily tell us everything about him though, as he has varied widely over the previous 8 seasons, ranging from .267 to .315.

    Overall, I think that BABIP can help you to look at whether a player may be due for a regression or an improvement, but it needs to be taken with a grain of salt. Over time, players will generally stay within a specific range of performance, and if that performance is high, BABIP may not tell you anything of use.