Tag Archives: Mark Teahen

Original Draft Series – Team # 22 – Oakland Athletics


For those that missed the guidelines I am using for this series of posts, you can find them here.

Team #22: Oakland Athletics

General Managers(since 1994)

Sandy Alderson (1994-1997): 261-321
Billy Beane (1998-Current): 1051-891

Team Performance

Playoffs Division Finish
WC League Playoff App 1st 2nd 3rd 4th
0 0 5 4 5 3 3

My hometown Athletics generally tend to have spurts of excellence. They had 4 playoff appearances in a row from 2000-2003, and another in 2006. The Athletics generally have been able to develop some players, but the depressing part is that almost invariably they have moved these players to acquire younger, cheaper players in order to stay competitive.  All information is drawn from Baseball Reference.

Position Name Acquired Years with Org.
Stats with Organization
Left?
C Kurt Suzuki 2004 – 2nd Rd 6 410 gm, .272/.329/.404, 37 HR, 199 RBI, 11 SB, 176 R Currently with Org.
1B Jason Giambi 1992 – 2nd Rd 7 + 1 2000 AL MVP, 2 All Star Appearances
1036 gm, .300/.406/.531, 198 HR, 715 RBI, 9 SB, 640 R
Free Agency – 11/5/01
2B Bobby Crosby 2001 – 1st Rd (25) 8 2004 AL Rookie of the Year
677 gm, .238/.305/.378, 61 HR, 263 RBI, 34 SB, 320 R
Free Agency – 11/5/09
3B Miguel Tejada Int’l FA – 1993 10 2002 AL MVP, 1 All Star Appearances
936 gm, .270/.331/.460, 156 HR, 604 RBI, 49 SB, 574 R
Free Agency – 10/27/03
SS Cliff Pennington 2005 – 1st Rd (21) 5 164 gm, .253/.329/.367, 7 HR, 50 RBI, 20 SB, 68 R Currently with Org.
LF Ryan Ludwick 1999 – 2nd Rd 3 No Major League Appearances with Org. Traded to TEX – 1/14/02
CF Nick Swisher 2002 – 1st Rd (16) 5 458 gm, .251/.361/.464, 80 HR, 255 RBI, 4 SB, 267 R Traded to CHW – 1/3/08
RF Andre Ethier 2003 – 2nd Rd 2 No Major League Appearances with Org. Traded to LAD – 12/13/05
DH Mark Teahen 2002 – 1st Rd (39) 2 No Major League Appearances with Org. Traded to KC – 6/24/04
SP Tim Hudson 1997 – 6th Rd 7 2 All Star Appearances
92-39, 3.30 ERA, 899 K, 382 BB, 1240.2 IP, 1.222 WHIP
Traded to ATL – 12/16/04
SP Barry Zito 1999 – 1st Rd (9) 7 2002 Cy Young Award, 3 All Star Appearances
102-63, 3.55 ERA, 1096 K, 560 BB, 1430.1 IP, 1.250 WHIP
Free Agency – 11/1/06
SP Dallas Braden 2004 – 24th Rd 6 18-27, 4.47 ERA, 231 K, 108 BB, 368.2 IP, 1.373 WHIP Currently with Org.
SP Joe Blanton 2002 – 1st Rd (24) 6 47-46, 4.25 ERA, 431 K, 202 BB, 760.2 IP, 1.330 WHIP Traded to PHI – 7/17/08
SP Rich Harden 2000 – 17th Rd 8 36-19, 3.42 ERA, 523 K, 232 BB, 541.2 IP, 1.244 WHIP Traded to CHC – 7/8/08
RP Kevin Gregg 1996 – 15th Rd 6 No Major League Appearances with Org. Free Agency – 10/15/02
RP Vin Mazzaro 2005 – 3rd Rd 5 6-10, 5.30 ERA, 78 K, 52 BB, 120.2 IP, 1.732 WHIP Currently with Org.
RP Tyson Ross 2008 – 2nd Rd 2 1-4, 5.77 ERA, 28 K, 16 BB, 34.1 IP, 1.485 WHIP Currently with Org.
RP Brad Kilby 2005 – 29th Rd 5 1-0, 1.07 ERA, 28 K, 4 BB, 25.1 IP, 0.829 WHIP Currently with Org.
RP Huston Street 2004 – 1st Rd (40) 4 2005 AL Rookie of the Year
21-12, 94 SV, 2.88 ERA, 271 K, 78 BB, 269 IP, 1.071 WHIP
Traded to COL – 11/10/08
CL Andrew Bailey 2006 – 6th Rd 4 2009 AL Rookie of the Year, 1 All Star Appearance
6-5, 39 SV, 1.84 ERA, 113 K, 31 BB, 112.1 IP, 0.899 WHIP
Currently with Org.
BN Trevor Cahill (SP) 2006 – 2nd Rd 4 16-15, 4.24 ERA, 132 K, 93 BB, 246 IP, 1.354 WHIP Currently with Org.
BN Eric Chavez (3B) 1996 – 1st Rd (10) 14 6 Gold Gloves (3B), 1 Silver Slugger (3B)
1320 gm, .267/.343/.478, 230 HR, 787 RBI, 47 SB, 730 R
Currently with Org.
BN Ramon Hernandez (C) Int’l FA – 1994 9 1 All Star Appearance
595 gm, .253/.322/.400, 60 HR, 263 RBI, 241 R
Traded to SD – 11/26/03
BN Jeremy Bonderman (SP) 2001 – 1st Rd (26) 1 No Major League Appearances with Org. Traded to DET – 8/22/02
BN Travis Buck (OF) 2005 – 1st Rd (36) 5 167 gm, .255/.335/.432, 18 HR, 71 RBI, 7 SB, 74 R Currently with Org.

June Amateur Draft

The Athletics have had 32 draft picks in the first round since 1995, including the notorious Moneyball draft of 2002 where they had 7 picks. They’ve done reasonably well in the first round, with Barry Zito, Eric Chavez, Joe Blanton, Nick Swisher and Huston Street all showing as successes from the round. They have also seen some a lot of successful players out of the 2nd round, but not nearly as many of these players showed their success with the Athletics. Most notably is probably RF Andre Ethier, who was traded to the Dodgers for Milton Bradley before the 2006 season. The team did make a playoff appearance in 2006, and was helped by Milton Bradley’s production, but I’m guessing that they would still love to have Ethier back.

International Free Agency

The Athletics haven’t been particularly good at finding international free agents, with only Miguel Tejada and Ramon Hernandez showing up on this roster. Part of this is the fact that they were unwilling to spend money on the top tier talent, as they would use that money for other items within development instead. That policy has changed slightly in the past few years, as the A’s have signed some top prospects out of the Dominican, most notably Michael Ynoa, a very young, very projectable pitcher. Time will tell if they will continue to see some prospects out of the international markets, but to this point the return has not been all that good.

Overall Grade

I think that the Athletics get my first “C”, as they have seen some excellent success stories (Zito, Chavez, Hudson), but there are quite a few of these players who did not make any appearances at all with the big league team. The fact that the international market has been so poor of a talent pool for them is what keeps me from moving them further up in the rankings.

Trade Retrospective – Johnny Damon


Next up on the trade retro writeups is the trade that brought Johnny Damon (and Mark Ellis) to the Oakland Athletics. On January 8, 2001, as a part of a 3-team trade, the Athletics acquired OF Johnny Damon, IF Mark Ellis, and P Cory Lidle, the Devil Rays acquired OF Ben Grieve, and the Royals acquired SS Angel Berroa, C A.J. Hinch, and CL Roberto Hernandez.

The Background

The Royals had developed another fine player in Johnny Damon. In the 2000 season, he had posted a .327/.382/.495 line with 16 home runs, 88 runs batted in, and a league leading 46 stolen bases. However, they also knew that he would be eligible to file for free agency after the 2001 season, and were extremely unlikely to be able to resign Damon to a long term contract extension.

The Athletics were coming off of their first division title in over 5 years, having beaten the Mariners to the division title by a 1/2 game. However, they had been eliminated in the first round by the Yankees, and over the span of the season had not really received a lot of “leadoff-type” production from their leadoff hitters.

The Devil Rays continued to hope to improve their team, and were looking to get better production out of their outfield.

The Moving Pieces

For Oakland, Damon was slotted in as the starting center fielder, pushing the previous center fielder, Terrence Long, to the left field spot vacated by Grieve. Mark Ellis was sent to the minors, and would be sent to AAA despite only playing 7 games at AA in the previous season. Lidle was penciled in as the 5th starter for the Major League club.

In Kansas City, Roberto Hernandez was put into the closer’s role, and it was hoped would help to stabilize the back end of their bullpen. Hinch was to be the backup catcher for the Royals, while Angel Berroa was sent to the Royals’ High-A affiliate.

Tampa slotted Ben Grieve in as their every day right fielder and expected him to be a key hitter in their lineup.

What Happened Next

The A’s improved on their previous season’s win total, winning 102 games but finishing 2nd in their division to the record-tying Mariners 116. They were the AL wild card, and drew the Yankees again. While Damon did not have a season quite like his 2000 season, he still posted a very respectable .256/.324/.363 line with 9 homeruns, 49 runs batted in, 27 stolen bases and 108 runs.

The Royals continued to slide to the bottom of the standings, winning only 65 games in 2001. Hernandez pitched reasonably well, recording 28 saves, but posting a 4.12 ERA.

The Devil Rays also took a step backward, losing 100 games again in 2001. Grieve hit alright, but was not quite as expected. He hit .264/.372/.387 with 11 homeruns, 72 runs batted in, and 7 stolen bases.

The Net Moves

Oakland – First Level

  • Damon only spent the 2001 season with the A’s, before leaving via free agency. His leaving did spawn quite a few stories later on though, as the A’s received 2 compensation draft picks for his leaving. These picks were in the group that were discussed in the Moneyball book, and were used specifically to select OF Nick Swisher and IF Mark Teahen. His 2001 season posted a 2.7 WAR.
  • Mark Ellis has been in Oakland since 2002, mostly as the starting 2B. In 880 games, he has posted a .265/.333/.406 slash line with 80 homeruns, 372 runs batted in, 48 stolen bases, and 475 runs. In each full season he has played, he has posted a minimum of 1.2 WAR.
  • Cory Lidle spent the 2001-2002 seasons with the Athletics in the back end of their rotation. In the 2 seasons, he posted a 21-16 record with a 3.74 ERA in 59 starts. He threw 380 innings, struck out 229 batters and walked 86. After the 2002 season he was traded to the Blue Jays for minor leaguers Chris Mowday and Mike Rouse.

Tampa Bay – First Level

  • Ben Grieve spent 3 seasons in Tampa, but never really lived up to the expectations of his performance upon his arrival. He hit .254/.364/.399 with 34 home runs, 153 runs batted in, 15 stolen bases, and 162 runs scored. He became a free agent after the 2003 season, and left Tampa. It does not appear that Grieve earned the Devil Rays any draft pick compensation.

Kansas City – First Level

  • Angel Berroa made his debut with the Royals in 2001, but did not become a regular until 2003, when he won the AL Rookie of the Year award.  He was with the Royals through 2007, and posted a .263/.305/.384 line with 45 home runs, 235 runs batted in, 50 stolen bases and 293 runs scored in 627 games. He was traded during the 2008 season to the Dodgers for minor leaguer Juan Rivera, who has not played in the Majors.
  • A.J. Hinch spent 2 seasons as the backup catcher for the Royals, getting into a total of 117 games and posting lackluster numbers. He was released after the 2002 season.
  • Roberto Hernandez also spent 2 seasons with the Royals, both as their closer. In 116 appearances, he posted an 8-16 record with 54 saves and 185 strikeouts in 218 innings pitched. He filed for free agency after the 2002 season. It does not appear that the Royals received any compensation picks for losing Hernandez.

Oakland – Second Level

  • Nick Swisher spent 4 seasons with Oakland, mostly split between CF, RF, and 1B. He hit .251/.361/.464 with 80 home runs and 255 runs batted in. His 2006 and 2007 seasons were both 3.8+ WAR, but was traded after the 2007 season to the White Sox for OF Ryan Sweeney and minor league pitchers Fautino de los Santos and Gio Gonzalez.
  • Mark Teahen never played for the Athletics, but was included in the Carlos Beltran trade made during the 2004 season.

Oakland – Third Level

  • Ryan Sweeney has been in the Majors with the A’s since 2008, and has hit reasonably well to this point. So far, he has hit .293/.349/.395 with 12 homeruns, 15 stolen bases, and 119 runs batted in. Both of his full seasons thus far have been 2+ WAR each.
  • Gio Gonzalez had been going back and forth between Oakland and AAA Sacramento last season, but appears to have finally stuck this season. So far with the A’s, Gonzalez is 12-14 with a 5.43 ERA. He’s struck out 189 batters in 187 1/3 innings, but has also walked 105 so far.
  • Fautino de los Santos continues to be a bit of an enigma, as he is still very young, and has not pitched very much for the A’s minor league affiliates.

Overall Reactions

At the time, this seemed like a reasonable enough trade. But in the end, it really looks like the Devil Rays (now the Rays) got fleeced pretty badly. They gave up a starting pitcher who was respectable at least (Lidle), a solid all-around infielder (Ellis), and a closer (Hernandez) to get an outfielder who really didn’t play all that well once he got to Tampa (Grieve). The Royals at least got some value out of Berroa for a few seasons, and Hernandez as well. The winners of this trade, clearly, appear to be the A’s. Not only did they get a season of Damon, but they also got quite a bit of production out of the players that they received in return for losing him to free agency. Throw in that they also got Ellis who has become an all-around solid 2B for the A’s, and to me it’s a slam dunk that the A’s did the best on this trade. Unfortunately it seems that a lot of the trades that were made during the Chuck LaMar era in Tampa Bay ended similarly to this.

Trade Retrospective: Carlos Beltran


Next up on the trade retrospectives is the trade of Carlos Beltran on June 24, 2004. He was a part of a 3-way trade from the Royals, with the Astros receiving Beltran, the Royals receiving C John Buck, IF Mark Teahen, and P Mike Wood, and the Athletics receiving RP Octavio Dotel.

The Background

The Royals started out the 2004 season off to a slow start, which wasn’t entirely unexpected. Knowing that 5-tool outfielder Carlos Beltran would be a free agent at the end of the season, it became extremely clear that the Royals were very likely to trade him so that they would receive something in return for the free-agent-to-be.

The Astros were in the heat of a pennant race, and had spent a lot of money in the previous offseasons on high level acquisitions including Roger Clemens. They were 38-34, and only 5 games back of the first place Cardinals.

The Athletics were 40-31, only a single game back of the first place Angels, and well in the race for a playoff spot. They had been using Arthur Rhodes in the closer’s role but not particularly effectively, and needed some improvement at the back end of the bullpen.

The Moving Pieces

Carlos Beltran slotted into the Astros’ lineup in center field and in the heart of the order. The Astros added another excellent bat in their lineup with Craig Biggio, Jeff Bagwell, Lance Berkman, and Jeff Kent already providing excellent production.

The Athletics slotted Dotel into as the closer, and moved everyone else back in the bullpen, with former closer Arthur Rhodes slotting in as the 8th inning guy.

John Buck was slotted in as the starting catcher for the Royals the next day. Mark Teahen was sent to AAA Omaha, and spent the remainder of the 2004 season there. Mike Wood was called up by the Royals and spent the remainder of the 2004 season in their rotation.

What Happened Next

Beltran had an excellent rest of the season, hitting .258/.368/.559. He helped to carry the Astros to the playoffs, with them qualifying for the wild card. His better performance actually came in the playoffs, as he hit .455/.500/1.091 with 4 HR, 9 RBI and 2 SB in the series victory over Atlanta. While they didn’t win their next series against the Cardinals, it wasn’t really anything related to Beltran’s performance, as he hit .417/.563/.958 with another 4 HR, 5 RBI and 4 stolen bases.

Octavio Dotel came in to Oakland slotted as the closer, and made 45 appearances. He posted a 4.09 ERA, a 6-2 record, and 22 saves. He also recorded 72 strikeouts in just 50 innings with the A’s, although was somewhat prone to homeruns, as he gave up 9 in that time.

John Buck hit .235/.280/.424 in 71 games, with 12 homeruns and 30 rbi. Mike Wood went 3-8 with a 5.94 ERA in 100 innings for the Royals, and was also prone to homeruns a bit, giving up 16 in that time frame.

The Net Moves

Houston – First Level

Carlos Beltran became a free agent at the end of the season, and was signed by the New York Mets. As a result of this, the Astros received two compensation picks from the Mets. They used these selections to take OF Eli Iorg (1st round supplemental) and SS Tommy Manzella (3rd round)

Oakland – First Level

Octavio Dotel pitched the remainder of the 2004 season, and the entire 2005 season with the Athletics, and became a free agent after the 2005 season. Unfortunately, he did not return any compensation picks for signing with the Yankees.

Kansas City – First Level

  • John Buck played for the Royals from the 2004 season through the end of the 2009 season, when he was non-tendered. He hit for some solid power for a catcher, hitting 18 in 2007. However, the batting average never really came along with it, and never hit for an average higher than .247 with them.
  • Mike Wood pitched for the Royals from the 2004 season through the 2006 season. Over that time, he posted an 11-19 record with a 5.28 ERA in 87 appearances (34 starts). He was waived by the Royals after the 2006 season, and claimed by the Rangers.
  • Mark Teahen spent the rest of 2004 at AAA, but was called up early in the 2005 season. He played for the Royals from 2005-2009, moving all over the field. 2006 was his best season with the Royals, as he hit .290/.357/.517 with 18 HR, 69 RBI and 10 stolen bases. During this previous offseason, he was traded to the White Sox for infielders Chris Getz and Josh Fields.

Houston – Second Level

  • Eli Iorg spent parts of the 2005-2009 seasons in the minors with the Astros, leading to his release in July of 2009. He appears to be out of baseball.
  • Tommy Manzella is now the starting shortstop for the Astros, although that only became fact at the start of this season.

Kansas City – Second Level

Chris Getz and Josh Fields are both currently on the major league roster, although Getz is on the disabled list. Both players appear to be hoping for a fresh start in Kansas City, as they were unlikely to break into the lineup in Chicago.

Overall Reactions

This trade was rather unusual, in that I am not 100% sold it worked out well for anyone. The Astros received an excellent half season of Beltran, but knew going into the trade that they were unlikely to resign him. As a result, the draft picks that they received as compensation had to calculate into the value received from him. And to this point, those have been a complete disaster. For the A’s, Dotel wasn’t quite enough to get over that last hump to get into the playoffs, and it is highly possible that he may have actually cost them some victories. I can distinctly remember feeling particularly un-confident in his ability to shut the door on the game when it was going on. The Royals probably made out the best on this, although I imagine that they had been hoping for a better return than the one that they got. Buck and Wood were essentially filler pieces based on their performance, but Teahen turned into a solid everyday player. It remains to be seen whether Chris Getz or Josh Fields will help them get return for him.

Team Preview – Chicago White Sox


Roster Makeup
Lineup Pitching Staff
Pos Name Role Name
C A.J. Pierzynski SP 1 Mark Buehrle
1B Paul Konerko SP 2 Jake Peavy
2B Gordon Beckham SP 3 Gavin Floyd
3B Mark Teahen SP 4 John Danks
SS Alexei Ramirez SP 5 Freddy Garcia
LF Carlos Quentin Bullpen
CF Juan Pierre CL Bobby Jenks
RF Alex Rios RP J.J. Putz
DH Andruw Jones RP Scott Linebrink
Bench RP Matt Thornton
IF Omar Vizquel RP Tony Pena
OF Mark Kotsay RP Dan Hudson

Additional roster information can be found at MLB Depth Charts.

Off-Season Transactions
Key Additions Key Losses
Pos Name How Pos Name How
3B Mark Teahen Trade (KC) IF Josh Fields Trade (KC)
CF Juan Pierre Trade (LAD) IF Chris Getz Trade (KC)
RP J.J Putz Free Agency RF Jermaine Dye Free Agency

Top Prospects: Tyler Flowers (C), Dan Hudson (P), Dayan Viciedo (IF)

2009 Review

The White Sox seemed prime to repeat as division champs after their victory in 2008. However, they saw a regression in some key players, most notably RF Jermaine Dye and LF Carlos Quentin. The offense was led by 1B Paul Konerko (.277, 28 HR), OF Scott Podsednik (.304, 30 SB), and rookie 3B Gordon Beckham (.270, 14 HR). Beckham, fresh out of the 2008 draft class, skyrocketed through the White Sox system in less than a full year, and was considered to be a strong candidate for the AL Rookie of the Year as well. The pitching staff was anchored as usual by SP Mark Buehrle (13-10, 3.84), SP John Danks (13-11, 3.77) and SP Gavin Floyd (11-11, 4.06).

Perhaps the most notable events of the White Sox season involved transactions made by the front office. The Sox thought that they had acquired SP Jake Peavy in May for a package of prospects led by P Aaron Poreda, but Peavy invoked his no-trade clause, and remained in San Diego for the time being. Strangely, it was announced on July 31st that the White Sox had acquired Peavy, again for a package of prospects led by Poreda. The part that made this really strange was the fact that Peavy was still on the disabled list recovering from an ankle injury at the time. Peavy’s acquisition kept the White Sox hopeful that if they were close, they could make a late season run at the division crown. This was furthered by the White Sox making a claim on Blue Jays’ outfielder Alex Rios. The Sox knew that they could potentially be on the hook for the entirety of Rios’ contract (some 6 seasons and over $60 M), but felt that the risk for a player of Rios’ quality was worth it.

By the end of August, the White Sox had fallen to 4 games under .500, and 6 games back in the division. At this point, they moved DH Jim Thome in an effort to allow him a chance at a championship run. They failed in their efforts to move RF Jermaine Dye however, mostly due to his struggles at the plate (.189, 2 HR in August). The White Sox finished the season with a 79-83 record, and 7.5 games out of first place.

Team Outlook for 2010

The White Sox went out and made some roster moves that have the potential to improve the team quite a bit from last year. They will look to get full, healthy seasons out of LF Carlos Quentin and SP Jake Peavy. They are hoping for improvements at 2B and CF with Gordon Beckham and Juan Pierre now manning those positions full time. And they are hopeful that the bullpen will be even more improved with the addition of J.J. Putz.

I am not sold that the 2010 version of the White Sox is drastically improved over the 2009 version. Having Peavy for a full season will definitely be an improvement, but I’m not sold that the additions of Mark Teahen, Juan Pierre, and Andruw Jones are substantial improvements over Chris Getz, Scott Podsednik, or Jim Thome. I think that in comparison to the other contenders in their division (Detroit, Minnesota), they simply haven’t improved enough to make a great run for the postseason. I think they’ll do better than the Tigers, but it wouldn’t surprise me if it ended in the opposite order. And it would take quite a bit of luck for them to catch Minnesota.

Fantasy Outlook for 2010

3B/2B Gordon Beckham, SS Alexei Ramirez, and 1B Paul Konerko are probably the best players on offense for the White Sox in terms of fantasy production. RP Bobby Jenks is always going to have value as long as he holds the closer’s role, but watch for either J.J. Putz or Matt Thornton to get a shot if Jenks struggles early on. Jake Peavy is the class of the starting rotation, but he comes with that wonderful risk of injury as well. Buehrle, Floyd, and Danks all can be useful starting pitchers, but I wouldn’t want to have to rely too heavily on them to be near the top of your fantasy rotation.

Prediction for 2010

The White Sox appear to be trying to make another run this season, before some of their better players (Konerko, Pierzynski, Buehrle) get too old to be useful. However, I don’t believe that the moves that they have made will put them over the top in the AL Central.

84-78, 2nd in the AL Central

Trade Review – CHW/KCR


Chicago White Sox trade 2B Chris Getz and 3B Josh Fields to the Kansas City Royals for 3B/OF Mark Teahen.
Source: ESPN.com

To be honest, I hadn’t really followed what Mark Teahen has been doing in Kansas City. My most common recollection of him is the fact that he was a part of the Carlos Beltran trade a few years ago, and that the Royals kept moving him all over the field, playing 2B, 3B, 1B, and OF during his time there. That said, he appears to have at least been a serviceable player at many of those positions, with a fair bat. For the White Sox, he’s going to be playing 3B, and shifting Gordon Beckham from 3B to 2B. When I first heard this trade, I assumed (wrongly it turns out) that Teahen would be playing right field, replacing the newly free-agent Jermaine Dye.

The Royals get two very serviceable players in Getz and Fields. Getz stole 25 bases last year in 107 games, and playing a solid 2B. Fields, who seemed to be in the doghouse constantly for the White Sox, hit 23 homers as a rookie in 2006, and hasn’t really seen consistent playing time since.

I really think that the Royals did well on this trade, as they sent a player who is one year from free agency, and in return got 2 young players that are under team control for much longer than that.

Some other analysis about this trade:


MLBTradeRumors’ coverage
ESPNChicago’s Jon Greenberg thinks the White Sox are just shuffling the deck.